[Sbse] SBSE Digest, Vol 98, Issue 4 co-authoring

Shannon Sanders McDonald smcdonald at siu.edu
Wed Dec 9 15:21:59 PST 2015


I saw that my University was not listed and thought that I had provided a response.  I personally receive a  paid research graduate student where sometimes I am also their thesis chair.  However, their research work with me extends beyond anything that that a normal thesis students at this University produces.  As their research chair and as their thesis chair I work continually with them throughout the process and assist with shaping their work.  I believe that the method followed by the science areas is appropriate for this type of process as far as named author.  I know if no issues with the students that have accomplished this with me where uncomfortable with this process.  I am happy to follow any established process decided by our group.  Their are "interesting" issues occurring in our department with respect to student participation in faculty work.

Assistant Professor Shannon Sanders McDonald, AIA
Southern Illinois University Carbondale
Quigley Hall MC 4337 (RM 137)
875 South Normal Ave Office #137
Carbondale, IL  62901-4303
618-453-1126 (p)
618-453-1129 (f)
618-303-6449 (c)
smcdonald at siu.edu
https://smcdonaldsite.wordpress.com/
http://architecture.siu.edu/faculty-staff/arc-id-faculty/mcdonald.php


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Today's Topics:

   1. Co-Authoring Papers with graduate students?  YES! (Douglas Noble)
   2. Re: Co-Authoring Papers with graduate students?  YES! (Ryan Smith)
   3. Winter Newsletter (Haglund, Bruce (bhaglund at uidaho.edu))
   4. Inspiration for next semester?s syllabus from BuildingGreen
      (Jerelyn Wilson)


----------------------------------------------------------------------

Message: 1
Date: Tue, 8 Dec 2015 23:06:29 +0000
From: Douglas Noble <dnoble at usc.edu>
To: "sbse at uidaho.edu" <sbse at uidaho.edu>
Subject: [Sbse] Co-Authoring Papers with graduate students?  YES!
Message-ID: <B00903E7-1FA2-4881-BCAD-3EBDD65D705C at usc.edu>
Content-Type: text/plain; charset="us-ascii"

Co-Authoring Papers with Graduate Students?

In two emails to SBSE members sent in the past couple of weeks, we asked building science faculty to let us know if they had co-authored papers with graduate students.  The question came up as a result of informal comments we had heard from a small number of non-technology architecture faculty who raised questions about our long-standing practice of co-authoring with students here at USC.  We knew that USC technology faculty have been co-authoring with students for at least a quarter of a century, and were doing so well before our arrival at USC in 1991, but we became suddenly unsure about this practice as a result of the comments from our respected colleagues. We have spent our careers working under the assumption that co-authoring with students was a respected and widely-held practice, but became concerned when others questioned it.

In our normal practice, those of us in building science at USC have co-authored many papers with graduate students.  Most of these papers were with Master of Building Science (MBS) students, and some were with Ph.D. students.  Some co-authored papers resulted from grant research, and some were related to the thesis and dissertation processes. Very importantly with regard to the thesis and dissertation research, the faculty who co-authored papers with students only did this when they were fully involved in the entire process including the research, outlining, writing, editing, presenting, etc.   This practice of co-authoring seems to work well, and our faculty are regularly reminded to discuss issues of author listing order in advance of each project.  As an unwritten guideline, we nearly always put the student name first if the paper is directly related to thesis / dissertation work.

At our school, the Master of Building Science (MBS) students are guided to select thesis research projects that align closely with the research interests of the faculty.  As a result, we are better prepared to help the students and properly guide the research.  Not nearly all thesis projects result in papers.  It is not a requirement of our program. We consider it an opportunity. We encourage the students, and we are diligent about providing serious participation in the work. Publishing is a mutual goal that we share with some of the students.  Of course, there are MBS thesis projects that are not ready for publication, or that do not advance knowledge in a way that would be valuable for dissemination.

In the informal feedback emails responding to the request, we have heard from more than 40 people connected with the universities listed at the end of this email.  We hope to hear from additional faculty in the coming days, but since we promised a draft report and wanted to send something prior to the end of the semester.  We hope to deliver more seriously organized notes about his in the near future.

It is likely that the results can be viewed as biased because we only included SBSE faculty.  Bias is also likely due to the hints provided in the survey preamble.  There are too many methodology flaws to extrapolate deeply.


VERY PRELIMINARY RESULTS (unofficial)

- Essentially all of the respondents said that they have co-authored with graduate students (or would like to but have not had the opportunity - 2 cases).

- 43 individual responses

- 29 universities represented (no official university positions taken: only individual faculty responses)

- No response from anyone at more than 100 additional schools of architecture in North America (we would still lik eto hear from anyone at these universities)

- Several respondents named schools that they were no longer at.  These were not included in this preliminary listing, though the faculty indicated in all of these cases that the response was the same as their current university.

- 21 respondents reported that they were a student co-author with a faculty member (this question was not formally asked, but many included it in their email replies).

- Two urged some caution about the possibility of faculty co-authoring on thesis worrk that the faculty did not truly fully participate in.

- A few encouraged that faculty co-authors must be directly seriously involved in the writing, outlining, presenting and/or data collection and analysis.

- Several included comments suggesting that Deans and University committees were perhaps not as welcoming

- A few observed that the practice of co-authoring with students was strong in some majors and less welcome in others (usually comparing some form of sciences with some form of humanities).

- Several included passionate commentary encouraging broadening the practice of co-authorship with graduate students.

- There were many positive anecdotal stories about personal co-authoring experiences as both a student and faculty member.

- A few reported that papers were sometimes frowned upon by colleagues when they did NOT include student co-authors, and that encouraging student/faculty co-authorship was highlighted, desired and expected.


THE MOST IMPORTANT RESULT
It is clear that the practice of co-authoring with graduate students is not at all unusual among the SBSE community, and co-authoring based on faculty/student collaboration on thesis research is common (with the understanding that the effort is appropriately truly collaborative).


RESPONDENTS THUS FAR INCLUDE FACULTY FROM THESE UNIVERSITIES:
(All responses should be considered individual faculty responses and not formal policies of the universities named below).

Arizona State University
Ball State University
Cal Poly Pomona
Cambridge University
Harvard University
IIT
Kent State
North Carolina State University
Oklahoma State University
Penn State University
Rensselaer Polytechnic Institute
The Technion
Universite Laval
University of Calgary
University of California, Berkeley
University of Houston
University of Idaho
University of Nebraska
University of Nevada, Las Vegas
University of North Carolina
University of Oregon
University of Southern California
University of Texas San Antonio
University of Utah
University of Washington
University of Wyoming
Virginia Tech
Washington State University
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Message: 2
Date: Wed, 9 Dec 2015 03:47:31 +0000
From: Ryan Smith <rsmith at arch.utah.edu>
To: Douglas Noble <dnoble at usc.edu>
Cc: "sbse at uidaho.edu" <sbse at uidaho.edu>
Subject: Re: [Sbse] Co-Authoring Papers with graduate students?  YES!
Message-ID: <7228457A-355E-45C6-B2A5-20A5842BA7AC at arch.utah.edu>
Content-Type: text/plain; charset="us-ascii"

Great work Doug.

Ryan E. Smith

Associate Professor
Associate Dean of Research + Community Engagement
Director, Integrated Technology in Architecture Center (ITAC)
(m) 385-215-0326 (o) 801-585-8948
rsmith at arch.utah.edu<mailto:rsmith at arch.utah.edu>

On Dec 8, 2015, at 4:06 PM, Douglas Noble <dnoble at usc.edu<mailto:dnoble at usc.edu>> wrote:

Co-Authoring Papers with Graduate Students?

In two emails to SBSE members sent in the past couple of weeks, we asked building science faculty to let us know if they had co-authored papers with graduate students.  The question came up as a result of informal comments we had heard from a small number of non-technology architecture faculty who raised questions about our long-standing practice of co-authoring with students here at USC.  We knew that USC technology faculty have been co-authoring with students for at least a quarter of a century, and were doing so well before our arrival at USC in 1991, but we became suddenly unsure about this practice as a result of the comments from our respected colleagues. We have spent our careers working under the assumption that co-authoring with students was a respected and widely-held practice, but became concerned when others questioned it.

In our normal practice, those of us in building science at USC have co-authored many papers with graduate students.  Most of these papers were with Master of Building Science (MBS) students, and some were with Ph.D. students.  Some co-authored papers resulted from grant research, and some were related to the thesis and dissertation processes. Very importantly with regard to the thesis and dissertation research, the faculty who co-authored papers with students only did this when they were fully involved in the entire process including the research, outlining, writing, editing, presenting, etc.   This practice of co-authoring seems to work well, and our faculty are regularly reminded to discuss issues of author listing order in advance of each project.  As an unwritten guideline, we nearly always put the student name first if the paper is directly related to thesis / dissertation work.

At our school, the Master of Building Science (MBS) students are guided to select thesis research projects that align closely with the research interests of the faculty.  As a result, we are better prepared to help the students and properly guide the research.  Not nearly all thesis projects result in papers.  It is not a requirement of our program. We consider it an opportunity. We encourage the students, and we are diligent about providing serious participation in the work. Publishing is a mutual goal that we share with some of the students.  Of course, there are MBS thesis projects that are not ready for publication, or that do not advance knowledge in a way that would be valuable for dissemination.

In the informal feedback emails responding to the request, we have heard from more than 40 people connected with the universities listed at the end of this email.  We hope to hear from additional faculty in the coming days, but since we promised a draft report and wanted to send something prior to the end of the semester.  We hope to deliver more seriously organized notes about his in the near future.

It is likely that the results can be viewed as biased because we only included SBSE faculty.  Bias is also likely due to the hints provided in the survey preamble.  There are too many methodology flaws to extrapolate deeply.


VERY PRELIMINARY RESULTS (unofficial)

- Essentially all of the respondents said that they have co-authored with graduate students (or would like to but have not had the opportunity - 2 cases).

- 43 individual responses

- 29 universities represented (no official university positions taken: only individual faculty responses)

- No response from anyone at more than 100 additional schools of architecture in North America (we would still lik eto hear from anyone at these universities)

- Several respondents named schools that they were no longer at.  These were not included in this preliminary listing, though the faculty indicated in all of these cases that the response was the same as their current university.

- 21 respondents reported that they were a student co-author with a faculty member (this question was not formally asked, but many included it in their email replies).

- Two urged some caution about the possibility of faculty co-authoring on thesis worrk that the faculty did not truly fully participate in.

- A few encouraged that faculty co-authors must be directly seriously involved in the writing, outlining, presenting and/or data collection and analysis.

- Several included comments suggesting that Deans and University committees were perhaps not as welcoming

- A few observed that the practice of co-authoring with students was strong in some majors and less welcome in others (usually comparing some form of sciences with some form of humanities).

- Several included passionate commentary encouraging broadening the practice of co-authorship with graduate students.

- There were many positive anecdotal stories about personal co-authoring experiences as both a student and faculty member.

- A few reported that papers were sometimes frowned upon by colleagues when they did NOT include student co-authors, and that encouraging student/faculty co-authorship was highlighted, desired and expected.


THE MOST IMPORTANT RESULT
It is clear that the practice of co-authoring with graduate students is not at all unusual among the SBSE community, and co-authoring based on faculty/student collaboration on thesis research is common (with the understanding that the effort is appropriately truly collaborative).


RESPONDENTS THUS FAR INCLUDE FACULTY FROM THESE UNIVERSITIES:
(All responses should be considered individual faculty responses and not formal policies of the universities named below).

Arizona State University
Ball State University
Cal Poly Pomona
Cambridge University
Harvard University
IIT
Kent State
North Carolina State University
Oklahoma State University
Penn State University
Rensselaer Polytechnic Institute
The Technion
Universite Laval
University of Calgary
University of California, Berkeley
University of Houston
University of Idaho
University of Nebraska
University of Nevada, Las Vegas
University of North Carolina
University of Oregon
University of Southern California
University of Texas San Antonio
University of Utah
University of Washington
University of Wyoming
Virginia Tech
Washington State University
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Message: 3
Date: Wed, 9 Dec 2015 05:51:11 +0000
From: "Haglund, Bruce (bhaglund at uidaho.edu)" <bhaglund at uidaho.edu>
To: "Mailman - sbse at uidaho.edu" <sbse at uidaho.edu>
Subject: [Sbse] Winter Newsletter
Message-ID:
        <CY1PR0401MB14866CC3C89827CB9712038FA1E80 at CY1PR0401MB1486.namprd04.prod.outlook.com>

Content-Type: text/plain; charset="iso-8859-1"

SBSEers,

I know you're on pins and needles. The News is now available at:


http://www.sbse.org/newsletter/issues/NewsW2015.pdf


Had to get it posted before the next big storm hits the Palouse...wind, rain, record high temperatures!?!?!

Cheers,

Bruce

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Message: 4
Date: Wed, 9 Dec 2015 12:37:18 -0500
From: Jerelyn Wilson <jerelyn at buildinggreen.com>
To: <sbse at uidaho.edu>
Subject: [Sbse] Inspiration for next semester?s syllabus from
        BuildingGreen
Message-ID:
        <1449682683-7033787.84511302.ftB9HbJWN015220 at rs143.luxsci.com>
Content-Type: text/plain; charset="utf-8"

Alex (Wilson) and I still remember the SBSE retreat we were invited to years ago in Savannah. The focus was first year studios. The presentations were very engaging and ended up informing the ways in which BuildingGreen has developed articles and other materials to support the work you do.

BuildingGreen continues to be the go-to resource for green building professionals and for future professionals.
I have a couple quick notes as you think about next semester.

1) Many of you are on campuses with full access to BuildingGreen.com <http://buildinggreen.com/>. (Not sure? Check here <http://bit.ly/H1NVlb>  or send me a quick note.) Here are two of our most recent feature articles, on products for the building envelope <http://www2.buildinggreen.com/article/what-makes-building-envelope-green-buildinggreen-s-guide-thermal-moisture-protection-product> and on chemical transparency in building products <http://www2.buildinggreen.com/article/why-chemical-transparency-matters>, that I think you?ll find useful.

2) If you?re teaching a class this spring, consider adding just one BuildingGreen article to your required reading list. Once your students get their feet wet with our resources, their sustainability knowledge grows rapidly.

3) We?ve developed syllabus supplements: Intro to Sustainability <http://bit.ly/1LI1kwR> and Green Materials <http://bit.ly/1MV1yVL>  These offer a useful structure for your course modules whether or not you are a BuildingGreen subscriber.

Contact me at jerelyn at buildinggreen.com <mailto:jerelyn at buildinggreen.com> if I can help in any way!

Jerelyn Wilson
Outreach Director
Firm and Campus Accounts
BuildingGreen, Inc.
122 Birge St., Suite 30,
Brattleboro, VT 05301
802-257-7300  x 102
http://www.buildinggreen.com <http://www.buildinggreen.com/>

KNOWLEDGE THAT INFORMS PRACTICE
Publishers of authoritative information on environmentally responsible building design and construction.



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